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Why 3D printing will change the world: reason 13

Before and after experimentation with the motor.

If you are reading this, you probably don’t need to be persuaded that 3D printing is changing the world in many ways. Its effect on manufacturing, shipping, inventory, and really the world economy as a whole is greater than we can imagine; not to mention the social and humanitarian good it can do by making medical devices and basic life serving technology and goods available more quickly and at a much lower cost.

3D printing provides a much more efficient way to prototype and produce goods when compared to traditional manufacturing methods that can be slow to develop and tend to create a lot of waste product. In the chain of processes that deliver the final goods, there is 3D printing’s significant effect on prototyping.

3D printing technology (also known as additive manufacturing) was introduced in the 1980s, and until very recently, the technology has remained out of the hands of most individuals unless they had access to an industrial machine. That means, unless you were a lead engineer at a large manufacturer, you probably would never print a prototype of anything, let alone some idea or concept you were curious about. The availability of 3D print technology to consumers has changed that. Opportunities for invention, exploration and creativity that spring from 3D print technology are leading to out-of-the-box trials and prototypes that were previously cost-prohibitive. These same opportunities can, and in many cases are, being used in the classroom.

3D printing in education is vital for today’s students who will enter a job market that values different skills not fostered in previous generations. 3D Printing can be used to teach strategies that will develop future in-demand skills in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM). Not only will 3D printing help develop these skills, it also promotes creative (including artistic) and analytical thinking.

3D printing is unleashing conceptual designs from the minds of students, amatuers, professional 3D designers and engineers worldwide. And that is a good thing. It allows for trial and error and ultimately success. As was the case when Christoph first set out to 3D print a brushless motor. V0 failed, a failure that couldn’t be predicted from the CAD modeling alone. Printing and testing the model was something that couldn’t have been easily accomplished at home in years past. With the help of his 3D printer, Christoph was able to print, test and ultimately create a fully workable brushless motor, and has since gone on to create so many other amazing pieces.

For a great list of ways 3D printing is changing the world - 175 ways to be exact - visit 3dforged.com/3d-printing and read their comprehensive article. Good read!

So, cheers to 3D printing and those adventurous enough to try their hand at it!

We are competing for the Capgemini Innovators Race 50 grant award to help fund our 3D printing initiative in education.

This funding will help pay for courseware, materials, and printers for students in public schools. We are currently doing a pilot project with 150 high school students split into 30 five-person teams, using makeSEA to collaborate on a build of the motor/generator and study of electricity over a 10 week period. We want to expand this program to many more students and classrooms, and this funding is key.

We need your help to win - all you have to do is click! Please take a moment to vote for us, here: https://innovatorsrace50.com/team/makesea-1.html

Click "Login to Vote" Then, be sure to actually click "VOTE"

Thanks to all of you for your support!

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