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Entries with tag makesea brushless motor .

This is why we share our designs!

We recently heard from Manes Cabanas, Associate Professor at the Universidad de Oviedo in Spain. He has used the makeSEA brushless motor as a teaching tool for his students in Electrical and Mechanical Engineering. He is using the project as a way to teach the theory of design and control of this type of motor.

For our Spanish speaking members he has created some interesting videos of the Project Overview, Winding the Stator, and using and printing with ProtoPasta ferromagnetic filament.

Check out the videos:

 

A viable, efficient 3D printed motor? Yes we can.

makeSEA 3D printable burshless motor  makeSEA motor rotor  makeSEA motor torque test

 

 

 

 

This was actually a dream of ours: to design a 3D-printable motor that can be printed on most basic 3D printer models and is powerful and efficient enough for common applications.

The design came from the amazing technical and exploratory mind of our Senior Maker, Christoph Laimer. And it was tricky. You can read all about the foibles of version 0 soon; incredibly valuable trials that led to the successful creation of version 1.

The four elegant components are printed with PTEG, PLA and magnetic PLA, and are paired with a steel shaft, a couple screws and bearings, magnets, and finally copper wire. The result is a relatively small motor (52mm diameter and 54mm length) that boasts 60% efficiency and enough power to run a small- to mid-size RC vehicle.

The makeSEA reference wiki has all the details on Christoph’s 3D printable brushless motor design, including a link to download a makeSEA rights managed version of the STL file.

Burning up

Airflow gaps for 3D printed motor with ABS material

Heat is an important consideration when working with 3D printable ABS and PTEG materials. Even though both filaments have solid strength and a melting temperature of around 250˚, it's important to keep heat gain in mind, particularly when you are using it as an enclosure for the rotating stator of a brushless motor.

For makeSEA's 3D printed brushless motor, Christoph chose to allow ample space between the stator and rotor for sufficient cooling air flow. Fortunately the necessary space wasn't so big that it compromised the size/usability of the motor. What are the other options for dealing with heat gain in a project like this?

The devil is in the details

makeSEA 3D printed rotor with magnets

When Christoph designed, printed and load tested version 1 (the second version) of the makeSEA brushless motor, he had some concerns about how many RPMs the rotor could sustain without breaking apart. As you know, 3D printing is not an exact science, and even the smallest anomaly or detail can cause wobble that at the very least, negatively effects efficiency and at the worse, results in magnetic projectiles careening through your workspace.

This brings up another question; he mentioned that the strength limits of the PLA and PTEG he used to print the rotor are worth exploring, particularly in relation to the weight of the magnets and RPMs. I'm curious if any makeSEA members want to share their own findings. If so, please do so below. But remember what they say: It's all fun until someone loses an eye, so be careful out there. 

If you want to check out how efficient Christoph's 3D printed motor was in the end, check out his extensive entry on the makeSEA 3D printed brushless motor on the reference wiki.

Check Out the makeSEA Mash Market® for a collection of useful designs related to this Wiki article.

Content with tag makesea brushless motor .